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Journal Article

The Uplifted Terraces of the Arkitsa Region, NW Evoikos Gulf, Greece: A Result of Combined Tectonic and Volcanic Processes?

Dimitris Papanastassiou, A. B. Cundy, K. Gaki-Papanastassiou, M. R. Frogley, K. Tsanakas and H. Maroukian
The Journal of Geology
Vol. 122, No. 4 (July 2014), pp. 397-410
DOI: 10.1086/676595
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/676595
Page Count: 14
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The Uplifted Terraces of the Arkitsa Region, NW Evoikos Gulf, Greece: A Result of Combined Tectonic and Volcanic Processes?
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Abstract

AbstractThe Arkitsa-Kamena Vourla area of central Greece occupies a zone of accommodation between the two tectonic provinces of the North Aegean Trough (the extension of the North Anatolian fault system) and the Gulf of Corinth and is characterized by a series of very prominent tectonic landforms, notably the large (ca. 1000 m elevation) footwall ridge of the Arkitsa-Kamena Vourla fault system. Despite the highly prominent nature of this footwall ridge and the presence of very fresh tectonic landforms, this fault system is not known to have hosted any major historical earthquakes, and the tectonic and geomorphic evolution of the Arkitsa-Kamena Vourla area remains poorly constrained. This article utilizes a combined geomorphological, sedimentological, and macro-/microfossil approach to evaluate the Late Quaternary evolution of the Arkitsa area, in the eastern part of the fault system, focusing on prominent uplifted terraces present in the hanging wall of the Arkitsa fault. Three distinct raised glaciolacustrine terraces and previously reported uplifted marginal marine deposits suggest sustained uplift of the coastline at a rate of 1–1.5 mm/yr over the past at least 40,000 yr, possibly dating to 75,000 BP. While movement on an offshore normal fault strand may explain more recent coastal uplift, purely fault-driven, longer-term uplift at this rate requires anomalously high fault-slip and extension rates. Consequently, the development of the terraces and other geomorphic indicators of uplift may be at least partly due to nonfaulting processes, such as Quaternary (intrusive and/or extrusive) volcanic activity associated with evolution of the nearby Lichades volcanic center.

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