Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Identifying spatial and temporal dynamics of proglacial groundwater–surface-water exchange using combined temperature-tracing methods

Dominic A. Tristram, Stefan Krause, Amir Levy, Zoe P. Robinson, Richard I. Waller and John J. Weatherill
Freshwater Science
Vol. 34, No. 1 (March 2015), pp. 99-110
DOI: 10.1086/679757
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/679757
Page Count: 12
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • More info
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Identifying spatial and temporal dynamics of proglacial groundwater–surface-water exchange using combined temperature-tracing methods
Preview not available

Abstract

AbstractThe effect of proglacial groundwater systems on surface hydrology and ecology in cold regions often is neglected when assessing the ecohydrological implications of climate change. We present a novel approach in which we combined 2 temperature-tracing techniques to assess the spatial patterns and short-term temporal dynamics of groundwater–surface-water exchange in the proglacial zone of Skaftafellsjökull, a retreating glacier in southeastern Iceland. Our study focuses on localized groundwater discharge to a surface-water environment, where high temporal- and spatial-resolution mapping of sediment surface and subsurface temperatures (10–15 cm depth) were obtained by Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS). The FO-DTS survey identified temporally consistent locations of temperature anomalies at the sediment–water interface, indicating distinct zones of cooler groundwater upwelling. The high-resolution FO-DTS surveys were combined with calculations of 1-dimensional groundwater seepage fluxes based on 3 vertical sediment temperature profiles, covering depths of 10, 25, and 40 cm below the lake bed. The calculated groundwater seepage rates ranged between 1.02 to 6.10 m/d. We used the combined techniques successfully to identify substantial temporal and spatial heterogeneities in groundwater–surface exchange fluxes that have relevance for the ecohydrological functioning of the investigated system and its potential resilience to environmental change.

Page Thumbnails

Part of Sustainability