Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

‘Everywhere is becoming the same’? labour utilisation, regulation and the tensions inherent in transnational IT production

Nicole Mayer-Ahuja and Patrick Feuerstein
Work Organisation, Labour & Globalisation
Vol. 2, No. 2 (Autumn 2008), pp. 162-178
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/workorgalaboglob.2.2.0162
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/workorgalaboglob.2.2.0162
Page Count: 17
  • Download ($20.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
‘Everywhere is becoming the same’? labour utilisation, regulation and the tensions inherent in transnational IT production
Preview not available

Abstract

Does the internationalisation of economic activities reduce the differences between locations in core and peripheral regions of capitalist production? This article contributes to this discussion by emphasising an inherent contradiction of transnational production: companies must draw upon divergent regulatory scenarios and strategies of labour utilisation and articulate them in their organisational structures in order to utilise ‘locational advantages’ and meet profit targets, but the integration of these divergent scenarios creates considerable organisational tensions. This scenario is illustrated through an analysis of the high attrition rates produced in the South Indian IT hub of Bangalore and how this is managed by one German software production company.

Page Thumbnails