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A.I.: Artificial Intelligence

Tim Kreider
Film Quarterly
Vol. 56, No. 2 (Winter 2002), pp. 32-39
DOI: 10.1525/fq.2002.56.2.32
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/fq.2002.56.2.32
Page Count: 8
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A.I.: Artificial Intelligence
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Abstract

What makes A.I. Steven Spielberg's most interesting work is that it's the first of his movies to be both a children's film and a film for adults. The story for children is the one the narrator tells—Pinocchio all over again. But the story for adults is about hopeless attachments and self-delusion; every character is obsessed with the image of a lost loved one, and tries to replace that person with a technological simulacrum. It's also a film about human brutality, callousness, and greed. This is a story not about a boy who becomes human, but about the death of humanity.

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