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Don't Ask, Don't Tell Me

Joshua Clover and Christopher Nealon
Film Quarterly
Vol. 60, No. 3 (Spring 2007), pp. 62-67
DOI: 10.1525/fq.2007.60.3.62
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/fq.2007.60.3.62
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Don't Ask, Don't Tell Me
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Abstract

ABSTRACT Brokeback Mountain insists on tragic realism. But Internet parodies of the film rework it to stage other emotions. And a 2001 Madonna video develops similar materials into a cowboy loneliness born of the ecstasy Brokeback Mountain forbids itself.

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