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Journal Article

Why Do Some Images Begin to Tremble? Cinema Revisits Militant Politics

Nina Power
Film Quarterly
Vol. 63, No. 2 (Winter 2009), pp. 23-30
DOI: 10.1525/fq.2009.63.2.23
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/fq.2009.63.2.23
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Why Do Some Images Begin to Tremble? Cinema Revisits Militant Politics
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Abstract

This essay discusses three films which in different ways reflect on left-wing militancy in the late 1960s and 70s—Uli Edel's The Baader Meinhof Complex, Chris Marker's reissued A Grin Without a Cat, Barbet Schroeder's Terror's Advocate—and argues that Marker's is the most insightful.

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