Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Physicians’ Stories: Autoethnography, Presence, and Rhizomatic Inquiry

Elissa Foster
International Review of Qualitative Research
Vol. 7, No. 3, Special Issue: The Bridge Building Power of Autoethnography (Fall 2014), pp. 290-301
DOI: 10.1525/irqr.2014.7.3.290
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/irqr.2014.7.3.290
Page Count: 12
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Physicians’ Stories
Preview not available

Abstract

This article reflects on a project in which the author guided several physicians as they wrote their first autoethnographic research articles, which were then presented at the International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry in 2011. Revisiting three of the physicians’ stories, the article articulates the significance of having physicians—scientists by training—engage autoethnography as an emotional, literary, poetic, and embodied practice. The author discusses the limitations of the “bridge” metaphor to capture the full impact of this project and other autoethnographic efforts and argues instead for the “rhizome” as more descriptive of the multiple, messy, boundary-crossing connections that are generated through autoethnographic writing and performance.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12