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Latin Journey

Latin Journey: Cuban and Mexican Immigrants in the United States

ALEJANDRO PORTES
ROBERT L. BACH
Copyright Date: 1985
Pages: 432
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pnr4h
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  • Book Info
    Latin Journey
    Book Description:

    Latin Journeydetails an eight-year study of Mexican and Cuban immigrants.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-90731-7
    Subjects: Sociology
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. vii-x)
  3. List of Tables (pp. xi-xvi)
  4. List of Figures (pp. xvii-xviii)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (pp. xix-xxii)
  6. 1 THEORETICAL OVERVIEW (pp. 1-28)

    The movement of human population across space represents one of the major recurrent themes in history. The causes of such movements have been very diverse: escape from hunger and political oppression, the search for economic opportunity, the lust for riches and conquest. The gradual constitution of a state system in the modern world has modified the character of many such movements, adding to them an explicitly political dimension. Contemporary migration movements occur both within the boundaries of particular states and across international borders. Although the causes of internal and international migrations are often similar, increasing state regulation and control separate...

  7. 2 IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES, 1890–1979 (pp. 29-71)

    By 1890, immigration to the United States had lost the characteristics of a colonizing movement from the metropolis and acquired those of a labor movement from peripheral countries to a new industrial center. During the three preceding decades, immigration had brought close to 10 million people to the country. From 1881 to 1890 alone, more than 5 million new immigrants arrived. The overwhelming majority of these came from “traditional” emigration countries—England, Ireland, Germany, France, and the Scandinavian countries. During the last decade of the nineteenth century, however, there was a marked shift toward new sources of immigration at the...

  8. 3 CONTRASTING HISTORIES: CUBAN AND MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS IN THE UNITED STATES (pp. 72-110)

    The two immigrant groups that furnish the primary data for the study are described in this chapter. Both are numerically important, ranking consistently among the top five national contingents of legal immigrants in recent years. Both come from similar cultural contexts and from the same world region—Latin America. Yet the specific origins of the two flows and the history of their incorporation into American society differ sharply. The combination of these characteristics is the main justification for a comparative research design: by comparing two large inflows, similar in cultural background but different in a series of structural variables, it...

  9. 4 PRELUDE TO IMMIGRATION: THE SOCIAL ORIGINS OF CUBAN AND MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS (pp. 111-163)

    This chapter initiates the analysis of our two immigrant samples by focusing upon two of the four principal subfields identified in Chapter 1: the social origins of immigrants and the stability and direction of migrant flows over time. Our primary purpose here is to describe the immigrants’ backgrounds, identifying in particular those personal attributes likely to be most important to their subsequent incorporation in the United States. To accomplish this goal, we must take the reader through a fairly lengthy excursion among findings produced by the first survey. The material presented consists of a tabular overview of results, with more...

  10. 5 THE FIRST SIX YEARS (pp. 164-199)

    The purpose of this chapter is to begin to address the two most popular classical subfields of immigration research: uses of immigrant labor and social adaptation in the country of destination. Our task is to describe the continuities and changes that the sampled Mexican and Cuban men experienced during their first six years as legal immigrants in the United States. As with the previous chapter, the intent is to lay the groundwork for subsequent, more complex analyses of the processes that account for the immigrants’ social and economic positions after this initial period of residence. To this end, we must...

  11. 6 THE CUBAN ENCLAVE IN MIAMI (pp. 200-239)

    This chapter examines the labor-market experiences of Cuban refugees in Miami. Our aim is to continue the analysis of survey results initiated in Chapter 4, weaving together the themes of class and ethnicity in order to explain economic and social positions of the sampled refugees after six years of resettlement. In contrast to that of the previous two chapters, however, the focus here is more analytical than descriptive and, where appropriate, utilizes relatively complex multivariate techniques.

    This analysis of labor-market behavior corresponds to the third theoretical area outlined in Chapter 1—the uses of immigrant labor. In that chapter, we...

  12. 7 THE SECONDARY LABOR MARKET: ECONOMIC AND OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY OF MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS (pp. 240-268)

    This chapter continues the exploration of the third research area outlined in Chapter 1: the uses of immigrant labor. In this instance, we focus on the experience of Mexican immigrants as they become incorporated in the American (primarily the Southwest) economy. In order to pursue this analysis in parallel fashion to that of Cuban refugees, we examine first that aspect that is most characteristic of the Mexicans’ entry into the United States labor market. Just as the central characteristic in the case of the Cubans was the rapid increase in self-employment, that among Mexicans was the substantial number with extensive...

  13. 8 AMERICA IN THE EYES OF THE IMMIGRANTS (pp. 269-298)

    In this chapter, we examine the views of immigrants with respect to American society and their place in it. In the first sections, we present the evolution of perceptions and attitudes of immigrants toward a variety of issues. The last part focuses on the development and measurement of a general concept—perceptions of society and discrimination—and an analysis of its determinants.

    The study of attitudes and perceptions corresponds to the fourth theoretical focus outlined in Chapter 1—the process of immigrant cultural adaptation. In the past, most scholars’ attention has focused on the ways the native population viewed different...

  14. 9 REACHING OUT: THE SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS OF IMMIGRANTS IN THE UNITED STATES (pp. 299-333)

    A second element of the process of immigrant adaptation that complements the transformation of values and perceptions is the changing social relationships of the immigrant community. Whom the immigrants see, with whom they interact, and what organizations they join are aspects at least as important as the jobs they hold, the money they make, and the views they hold about the receiving society.

    The study of immigrant relationships can be subdivided, in turn, into two aspects, one qualitative and the other quantitative. We want to know, first of all, how frequent these relationships are, both at the level of primary...

  15. 10 CONCLUSION: IMMIGRATION THEORY AND ITS PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS (pp. 334-348)

    In the preceding chapters, we have presented a great deal of information on two recent immigrant groups and their histories after reaching American shores. These final pages are not dedicated to a detailed summary of the findings, since such summaries are found in the concluding sections of each of the preceding seven chapters. The reader unable to read through the entire text is referred to those sections for a synthesis of the major results.

    Our goal in this book was to tell the story of Cuban and Mexican immigrants arriving in the United States in recent years, but to do...

  16. APPENDIX (pp. 349-368)
  17. BIBLIOGRAPHY (pp. 369-382)
  18. INDEX (pp. 383-387)