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The Totality for Kids

The Totality for Kids

JOSHUA CLOVER
Copyright Date: 2006
Edition: 1
Pages: 76
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pp05j
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  • Book Info
    The Totality for Kids
    Book Description:

    The Totality for Kidsis the second collection of poems by Joshua Clover, whose debut,Madonna anno domini, won the Walt Whitman award from the Academy of American Poets. This volume takes as its subject the troubled sleep of late modernity, from the grandeur and failure of megacities to the retreats and displacements of the suburbs. The power of crowds and architecture commingles with the alienation and idleness of the observer, caught between "the brutal red dream/Of the collective" and "the parade/Of the ideal citizen." The book's action takes place in these gaps, "dead spaces beside the endlessly grieving stream." The frozen tableau of the spectacle meets its double in the sense that something is always about to happen. Political furies and erotic imaginings coalesce and escape within a welter of unmoored allusions, encounters, citations, and histories, the dreams possible within the modern's excess of signification-as if to return revolutionary possibility to the regime of information by singing it its own song.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-93909-7
    Subjects: Language & Literature
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[vi])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [vii]-2)
  3. CERISERIE
    (pp. 3-5)

    Music: Sexual misery is wearing you out.

    Music: Known as the Philosopher’s Stair for the world-weariness which climbing it inspires. One gets nowhere with it.

    Paris: St-Sulpice in shrouds.

    Paris: You’re falling into disrepair, Eiffel Tower this means you! Swathed in gold paint, Enguerrand Quarton whispering come with me under the shadow of this gold leaf.

    Music: The unless of a certain series.

    Mathematics: Everyone rolling dice and flinging Fibonacci, going to the opera, counting everything.

    Fire: The number between four and five.

    Gold leaf: Wedding dress of the verb to have, it reminds you of of.

    Music: As the...

  4. EARLY STYLE
    (pp. 8-8)
  5. “ALAS, THAT IS THE NAME OF OUR TOWN; I HAVE BEEN CONCEALING IT ALL THIS TIME”
    (pp. 9-10)
  6. BAROQUE PARABLE
    (pp. 11-11)
  7. BLUE’S 1900
    (pp. 14-14)
  8. THE OTHER ATELIER
    (pp. 15-15)
  9. AEON FLUX: JUNE
    (pp. 16-16)

    Not sibylline but clear, empty weather; of the eight kinds of sky it was the milk-paled potion most like a cup of coffee she poured past full in such a way as to show herself how good she was, how the liquid lolled just over the white cup’s rim, just so the instant before an apology, until the surface broke and color seeming singular though made of mix came sweetly over the sides after which she could never think of herself as perfect again, falling deeper into bright degradation as one falls down a well with great relief, forgetting on...

  10. AUTEUR THEORY
    (pp. 17-17)

    And then at the last second, after the conceptual, after graffiti, after the Top 40, during architecture, after great pain, after mystery, after the feuilleton, after the blue suburbs, after Malevich, after the rise of the South, after indeterminacy, after Gerhard Richter, under the snow, after dinner, after the red suburbs, after New French Girlfriend, after the movie, after unitary urbanism, after indie rock,...

  11. ANTWERP RAINY ALL CHURCHES STILL HAUNTED
    (pp. 18-19)
  12. A-SHAPED GATE
    (pp. 21-21)
  13. RUE DES BLANCS MANTEAUX
    (pp. 22-22)
  14. IN JAUFRÉ RUDEL’S SONG
    (pp. 23-23)
  15. NO MORE BOFFINS
    (pp. 24-25)
  16. LETTERS AND SODAS
    (pp. 28-28)
  17. FRENCH NARRATIVES
    (pp. 29-29)
  18. ÇA IRA
    (pp. 30-30)
  19. KANTINE
    (pp. 31-31)

    And then at the last second, after Malevich, after Gerhard Richter, after the conceptual, after graffiti, after the feuilleton, after indeterminacy, after New French Girlfriend, after indie rock, after the Top 40, after great pain, after dinner, after the movie, after mystery, after unitary urbanism, after the blue suburbs, after the red suburbs, after the Rise of the South, during architecture, under the snow,...

  20. THE DARK AGES
    (pp. 33-34)

    Many people had candles and torches were a dime a dozen. “You Light Up My Life” was one of the most popular songs. What about illuminated manuscripts, and those lightbulbs every time they had an idea—imagine how that must have been in the Dark Ages! Stealth would favor the village idiot, but a wise man would be as a strobe light in a rainstorm. Once in the Dark Ages, believing the precinct to be deserted, I wandered as one lost. Then the beams of a passing car would light the street for some distance, all the other faces flashing...

  21. EN ABYME
    (pp. 35-35)
  22. “AN ARCHIVE OF CONFESSIONS, A GENEALOGY OF CONFESSIONS”
    (pp. 36-36)
  23. “OF THE CITY OF THE DARK . . .”
    (pp. 37-37)
  24. VALIANT EN ABYME
    (pp. 40-41)
  25. FERAL FLOATS THE FORM IN HEAVEN AND OF LIGHT
    (pp. 42-42)
  26. PARABLE LESTRANGE
    (pp. 43-43)
  27. A BOY’S OWN STORY
    (pp. 48-48)

    And then at the last second, after the Top 40, under the snow, after the conceptual, after the blue suburbs, after great pain, after the feuilleton, after graffiti, after the Rise of the South, after the movie, after unitary urbanism, during architecture, after mystery, after Gerhard Richter, after indeterminacy, after indie rock, after Malevich, after the red suburbs, after dinner, after New French Girlfriend,...

  28. RETURN TO RUE DES BLANCS MANTEAUX
    (pp. 49-49)
  29. WHITEREAD WALK
    (pp. 50-50)

    Vertigo Europa austere museum sex hotel record shop Odeon neon breath isolations in the vale of lang climbing the Whispering Gallery doing the Strand glad girls paper wedding painted retina crosses a small continent between two bars colored rays of visible things in the Spring in the superlative Hotel Europa Drag the light of the past tense falls from an iron hotel railing a long skirt drenched in lassitude all Polaroids are out of focus felt anagogic the taxi came thwack we drove into a book...

  30. THEIR AMBIGUITY
    (pp. 51-55)
  31. WHITEREAD WALK
    (pp. 56-56)

    Monumental the lacunae between illbiquitous promenaders down to the Square past the Open 24 Hours as social forms of grieving we are prohibited this is the remix the new glitch has been recalled melancholy of luscious Pictober the fall of the phenomenon into the iris back with another one of those Return of the Flaneur as hardcore Autumnophage echolocation always places you in a different country the cure is beats per minute bad year in Brooklyn Bombs Over Baghdad the negative needs no introduction and/or here we go!...

  32. FOR THE LITTLE SOLDIER
    (pp. 57-57)

    So it turns out I am totally a Knight Templar at loose ends now that the Crusades are discredited and the banking industry is controlled by lawyers which like New Yorkers is really just code for Jews. Now I like to read magazines called things likeTeleStarandShockand post to my blog in whatTeen Peoplecalled the latest in mediated indifference. Sometimes I like to compose little poems and imagine you reading them. I like to pretend you are a real person dressed in a suit selling copies of Mao’s Little Red Book on Sproul Plaza and...

  33. LATE STYLE
    (pp. 58-58)
  34. YEAR ZERO
    (pp. 59-62)
  35. WHAT’S AMERICAN ABOUT AMERICAN POETRY?
    (pp. 63-63)
  36. AT THE ATELIER TELEOLOGY
    (pp. 64-68)
  37. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. 69-70)
  38. Back Matter
    (pp. 77-77)