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Do Incentives Exert Undue Influence on Survey Participation? Experimental Evidence

Eleanor Singer and Mick P. Couper
Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: An International Journal
Vol. 3, No. 3 (September 2008), pp. 49-56
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.1525/jer.2008.3.3.49
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jer.2008.3.3.49
Page Count: 8
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Do Incentives Exert Undue Influence on Survey Participation? Experimental Evidence
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Abstract

MONETARY INCENTIVES ARE INCREASINGLY used to help motivate survey participation. Research Ethics Committees have begun to ask whether, and under what conditions, the use of monetary incentives to induce participation might be coercive. The article reports research from an online vignette-based study bearing on this question, concluding that at present the evidence suggests that larger incentives do not induce research participants to accept higher risks than they would be unwilling to accept with smaller ones.

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