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What Research Participants Want to Know About Genetic Research Results: The Impact of “Genetic Exceptionalism”

Miguel Ruiz-Canela, J. Ignacio Valle-Mansilla and Daniel P. Sulmasy
Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: An International Journal
Vol. 6, No. 3 (September 2011), pp. 39-46
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.1525/jer.2011.6.3.39
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jer.2011.6.3.39
Page Count: 8
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What Research Participants Want to Know About Genetic Research Results: The Impact of “Genetic Exceptionalism”
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Abstract

The disclosure of individual genetic results has generated an ongoing debate about which rules should be followed. We aimed to identify factors related to research participants’ preferences about learning the results of genomic studies using their donated tissue samples. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 279 patients from the United States and Spain who had volunteered to donate a sample for genomic research. Our results show that 48% of research participants would like to be informed about all individual results from future genomic studies using their donated tissue, especially those from the U.S. (71.4%) and those believing that genetic information poses special risks (69.7%). In addition, 16% of research participants considered genetic information to be riskier than other types of personal medical data. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that a high proportion of participants prefer to be informed about their individual results and that there is a higher preference among those research subjects who perceive their genetic information as riskier than other types of personal medical data.

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