Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Complementary Pair: Stylistic Experimentation in Mozart's Final Piano Concertos, K. 537 in D and K. 595 in B-flat

Simon P. Keefe
The Journal of Musicology
Vol. 18, No. 4 (Fall 2001), pp. 658-684
DOI: 10.1525/jm.2001.18.4.658
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jm.2001.18.4.658
Page Count: 27
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($22.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Complementary Pair: Stylistic Experimentation in Mozart's Final Piano Concertos, K. 537 in D and K. 595 in B-flat
Preview not available

Abstract

Given the chronological separation of Mozart's final piano concertos, K. 537 and K. 595, from his extraordinary sequence of 15 piano concertos of 1782-86 (K. 413-503), it is no surprise that critics have continually stressed stylistic and affective departures from the composer's norm. But the stylistic significance of these final concertos remains fundamentally misunderstood. In spite of sharply contrasting characteristics—ostentatious virtuosity in K. 537 and carefully measured writing in K. 595—these works are, in fact, kindred spirits. In both concertos Mozart experiments with the introduction of abrupt juxtapositions of harmonically contrasting material while avoiding the outright opposition of piano and orchestral forces evident in his earlier Viennese first movements; with piano figuration, omitting it when expected or reconstituting it at important formal junctures; and with unexpected thematic and harmonic disjunctions. While Mozart's harmonic experimentation in K. 537 and 595 can be partially explained in general stylistic terms, given similarities to passages in the last three symphonies, and considered representative of the "bizarre tonal sequences" and "striking modulations" often remarked upon by Mozart's contemporaries, it cannot be attributed to a fundamental shift in the composer's "world view." Rather, the complementary nature of radicalism and innovation in the two first movements in particular—K. 537 in the orchestral and solo expositions and recapitulation and K. 595 in the development—reveals these final concertos as thoroughly pragmatic and systematic essays in stylistic reinvention.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27