Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Political Attitudes, Social Capital, and Political Participation: The United States and Mexico Compared

Joseph L. Klesner
Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos
Vol. 19, No. 1 (Winter 2003), pp. 29-63
DOI: 10.1525/msem.2003.19.1.29
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/msem.2003.19.1.29
Page Count: 35
  • Download ($22.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Political Attitudes, Social Capital, and Political Participation: The United States and Mexico Compared
Preview not available

Abstract

Political values have impact when they shape political participation. A comparison of political participation rates of Mexicans, Mexican-Americans, and the general U.S. population reveals that participation is highest among the general U.S. population, lowest among Mexicans, and at intermediate rates among Mexican-Americans. The article explores the attitudinal bases of political participation, finding that political engagement is a strong predictor of participation, while general perspectives on the political regime do not shape participation rates. The strongest predictors of political participation are variables generally grouped under the category social capital: involvement in non-political organizations, social trust, and an avoidance of television. Because Mexicans and Mexican-Americans have lower levels of social capital, political participation is lower among those groups than the general U.S. population. Yet, there remain unexplained differences in participation among the three groups that can be attributed to institutional and historical constraints on political involvement in Mexico and among Mexican-Americans. Los valores políticos tienen impacto cuando contribuyen a formar la participación política. Una comparación de las tasas de participación política de mexicanos, mexicano-americanos y la población general estadounidense revela que la participación más alta se da en la población general estadounidense, la más baja en los mexicanos, y el nivel intermedio en los mexicano-americanos. El artículo explora las bases de las actitudes en la participación política, encontrando que el involucramiento político es un fuerte indicador de la participación, mientras que las perspectivas generales sobre el régimen político no forman tasas de participación. Los pronósticos más fiables de participación política son las variables generalmente agrupadas bajo la categoría de capital social: participación en organizaciones no políticas, confianza social, y la anulación de la televisión. Dado que los mexicanos y los mexicano-americanos tienen niveles más bajos de capital social, la participación política es inferior entre estos grupos que en la población general estadounidense. No obstante, hay aún diferencias no explicadas de la participación en los tres grupos que pueden ser atribuidas a restricciones institucionales e históricas sobre la participación política en México y entre los mexicano-americanos.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35