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Death and Translation

HAUN SAUSSY
Representations
Vol. 94, No. 1 (Spring 2006), pp. 112-130
DOI: 10.1525/rep.2006.94.1.112
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/rep.2006.94.1.112
Page Count: 19
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Death and Translation
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Abstract

ABSTRACT A poem by Baudelaire, rendered by its first Chinese translator in language that recalls the early Daoist philosopher Zhuangzi, resembles less amimesis of the total work than an assimilative digestion of the work's fragments. This practice of translation operates in counterpoint to the rhetoric of decay prominent in the original poem, here decoded with the help of Aristotle and Dante.

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