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George Herbert Mead and the “Division Of Labor”: Macrosociological Implications Of Mead'S Social Psychology

Hans Joas
Symbolic Interaction
Vol. 4, No. 2 (Fall 1981), pp. 177-190
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction
DOI: 10.1525/si.1981.4.2.177
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/si.1981.4.2.177
Page Count: 14
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George Herbert Mead and the “Division Of Labor”: Macrosociological Implications Of Mead'S Social Psychology
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Abstract

By presenting some results of an extensive reconstruction of George Herbert Mead's work published as yet only in German it is argued that Mead's work as a whole and particularly his social psychology contain an implicit conception of social order. This can be characterized as the idea that it is not normative integration as such, but communicative coordination that makes possible human society and social order. This is shown by findings on the early development of Mead's ideas (Hegelianism, Definition of the Psychical), on German influences in Mead, and on the meaning of democracy as self-government in Mead's political biography. Some hints to a comparison of Mead with other concepts of social order (Durkheim; negotiated order approach) are given.

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