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Peeking Through the Opomulero Lens: Tunde Kelani's Women on Center Stage

Jumoke Giwa-Isekeije
The Global South
Vol. 7, No. 1, Nollywood and the Global South (Spring 2013), pp. 98-121
Published by: Indiana University Press
DOI: 10.2979/globalsouth.7.1.98
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/globalsouth.7.1.98
Page Count: 24
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Peeking Through the Opomulero Lens: Tunde Kelani's Women on Center Stage
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Abstract

This paper examines the representation of women in Tunde Kelani's video films through an analysis of Ti Oluwa Ni Ile 1, Campus Queen, The Narrow Path, and Thunderbolt. I use Kelani's films as a counterpoint to argue that women are not always essentialized in Nigerian video films. The paper also interrogates the revisioning of Nigeria's colonial history and portrayal of modernity in Nigerian movies using third-world feminist and post-colonial theories. I develop an inductive typology introducing the five analytical categories of normative pre-colonial, dominant colonial, polemical post-colonial, pervasive neo-colonial, and persistent pseudo-colonial for examining the representation of women in the four video films.

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