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Liberating Praxes of Latin American Women Educators in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Argentina

Lauren Ila Jones
Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion
Vol. 28, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 197-214
Published by: Indiana University Press on behalf of FSR, Inc
DOI: 10.2979/jfemistudreli.28.1.197
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/jfemistudreli.28.1.197
Page Count: 18
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Liberating Praxes of Latin American Women Educators in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Argentina
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Abstract

Through semistructured interviews with female social movement participants in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Argentina, Jones asks, How do women in Latin American social movements perceive the influence of theology on these movements' pedagogies? She argues that through this work, the women cultivate personal theologies rooted in their understanding of their own reality. Collectively, this creates an ecumenical theology of struggle. Jones concludes that the women have shown theology to be both a tool of analysis and a tool of action to address race and ethnic, class, and gender inequality. Ultimately, she argues that these women perceive the influence of theology on their movements' pedagogies as an influence that leads to their liberation. This concept of liberation motivates women to participate in the struggle against neoliberal globalization through nonformal and formal education that contributes, ultimately, to holistic community development.

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