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Role-Playing in the Classroom: Gender Differences in Reactions of Bahraini Students

Nina Abdul Razzak
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies
Vol. 7, No. 2 (Spring 2011), pp. 89-102
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2979/jmiddeastwomstud.7.2.89
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/jmiddeastwomstud.7.2.89
Page Count: 14
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Role-Playing in the Classroom: Gender Differences in Reactions of Bahraini Students
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Abstract

ABSTRACT Faculty at Bahrain Teachers' College were concerned that their students lacked the ability to succeed in educational contexts designed to promote deep, or active, student-centered, learning. Deep learning is an educational approach that involves critical analysis, the linking of ideas and concepts, creative problem solving, and application. The researcher introduced role-playing to encourage more active learning among the students and to assess gender differences in their reactions to a method that requires a great deal of open-mindedness and risk-taking. Results indicated a high satisfaction rate and few gender differences in reactions towards role-playing, with uniquely interesting implications for both educational institutions and gender studies.

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