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Dictionary of Basilian Biography

Dictionary of Basilian Biography: Lives of Members of the Congregation of Priests of Saint Basil from Its Origins in 1822 to 2002

Revised and augmented by P. Wallace Platt
Copyright Date: 2005
Pages: 650
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt1287r66
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  • Book Info
    Dictionary of Basilian Biography
    Book Description:

    TheDictionary of Basilian Biographycontains 632 biographical entries on the members of the Congregation of Saint Basil who died in the years between 1822, when the congregation was founded, and 2002. The dictionary presents the personal background, education, and various appointments as well as the character, talents, and bibliography of each member, while defining the contribution of each in the educational or pastoral work of the Basilian Fathers. This heritage belongs not only to the Basilian Fathers or the Catholic Church, but to the wider societies and cultures of the countries that were touched by the work of the Basilians.

    This second edition of theDictionary of Basilian Biographyis approximately three times the size of the original edition by Father Robert J. Scollard, published in 1969. The increase in size is due not only to the additional number of members who died between that year and 2002, but also to additional archival research into the lives and careers of the early members of the Congregation in France. It represents eight years of work by editor P. Wallace Platt and his editorial board, enriching the book and balancing its presentation.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-5739-7
    Subjects: Religion
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Preface (pp. ix-xiv)
    P. Wallace Platt
  4. Introduction (pp. xv-xx)

    The Congregation of Saint Basil (Basilian Fathers) took its origins¹ from a small group of diocesan priests in the Vivarais (Ardèche) region of southern France. Defying the anticlerical legislation passed during the French Revolution, they accepted the task of conducting a clandestine seminary in an almost inaccessible little village called Saint-Symphorien-de-Mahun. In 1802, when the danger was considered past, they moved the school to the town of Annonay,² some fifty kilometres south of Lyon near the Rhône River. Having leased for this purpose a former Franciscan convent, they called the school the ‘Collège des Cordeliers.’ At the same time they...

  5. Significant Dates of Basilian Foundations (pp. xxi-xxii)
  6. Abbreviations (pp. xxiii-xxiv)
  7. Glossary (pp. xxv-xxviii)
  8. Dictionary of Basilian Biography
  9. Appendix: Basilians by Chronological Order of Death (pp. 699-715)