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Reconsidering some Plautine Elements in Plautus (Amphitryo 302–7, Captivi 80–4)

Michael Fontaine
The Classical Journal
Vol. 111, No. 4 (April-May 2016), pp. 417-427
DOI: 10.5184/classicalj.111.4.0417
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5184/classicalj.111.4.0417
Page Count: 11
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Reconsidering some Plautine Elements in Plautus (Amphitryo 302–7, Captivi 80–4)
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Abstract

This paper supplements my Funny Words in Plautine Comedy (2010) by reinterpreting two famous “Plautine elements in Plautus.” Part one (on Amphitryo 302–7) argues that the pun on Quintus (the name) and quattuor, “four,” translates a pun in the Greek model on Pentheus and tettaras, “four.” Part two (on Captivi 84) argues that rurant, “they are in the countryside,” should be rorant, “they are glistening,” sc. unguento, “with after-bath oil.” The examples suggest Plautus' genius lay as much or more in inspired translation as it does in his “originality.”

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