Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Benjamin, Dante, and the Modernity of the Middle Ages; or, Allegory as Urban Constellation

Ethan Knapp
The Chaucer Review
Vol. 48, No. 4, SPECIAL ISSUE Thinking Historically after Historicism: Essays in Memory of Lee Patterson (2014), pp. 524-541
DOI: 10.5325/chaucerrev.48.4.0524
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/chaucerrev.48.4.0524
Page Count: 18
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
Benjamin, Dante, and the Modernity of the Middle Ages; or, Allegory as Urban Constellation
Preview not available

Abstract

This article interrogates the categories of modernity and allegory in Walter Benjamin's work. It contrasts the treatment of Baudelaire (the archetypical poet of modernity) in Benjamin's short essay “On Some Motifs in Baudelaire” with the treatment found in his Arcades Project, championing the more complex sense of allegory in the later work. It argues further that Benjamin's sense of allegory in this text is bound to the specific urban experience of the crowd, and that the association of allegory with urban crowds leads Benjamin to discover this constellation in both medieval and modern allegorical representations. The article ends with a reading of Dante's Vita Nuova.

Page Thumbnails