Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

The First Psychiatric Royal Commission: Reg Ellery and the Attendants at Kew Hospital

Robert M. Kaplan
Health and History
Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014), pp. 45-65
DOI: 10.5401/healthhist.16.1.0045
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5401/healthhist.16.1.0045
Page Count: 21
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Download ($20.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
The First Psychiatric Royal Commission: Reg Ellery and the Attendants at Kew Hospital
Preview not available

Abstract

The first Royal Commission into the activities of a psychiatrist took place in Melbourne in 1924, inquiring into misconduct by Dr Reg Ellery at Kew Hospital. Ellery, appalled by the conditions at the Idiot Cottages, had attempted to make improvements for the children. This led to a confrontation with the Attendant's Union—who had been challenging the power of doctors to run the asylums—which met with an unexpected change in Victorian state politics to lead to the establishment of the Royal Commission. Though Ellery was in the end exonerated, his subsequent treatment by the Lunacy Department was slightly insulting, featuring a transfer to another hospital. Despite all this, however, Ellery went on to become the most prominent psychiatrist in Australia between the wars.

Page Thumbnails