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Journal Article

Four Deaths: The Near Destruction of Western Oregon Tribes and Native Lifeways, Removal to the Reservation, and Erasure from History

David G. Lewis
Oregon Historical Quarterly
Vol. 115, No. 3 (Fall 2014), pp. 414-437
DOI: 10.5403/oregonhistq.115.3.0414
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5403/oregonhistq.115.3.0414
Page Count: 24
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Four Deaths: The Near Destruction of Western Oregon Tribes and Native Lifeways, Removal to the Reservation, and Erasure from History
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Abstract

Whether physical, cultural, legal, or in scholarship, death has been part Western Oregon tribes' lives since contact with newcomers. Yet, Native people have survived. This shared tribal legacy, however, is still unknown to many people throughout the state, and according to Lewis, “such historical ignorance is another kind of death — one marked by both myth and silence.” He shares stories of his ancestors' death experiences through removal, assimilation, and termination. As tribal historian for the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Lewis works to ensure that Native voices are heard in order to “produce and interpret history that continue[s] to develop and will result in a better history for all Oregonians.”

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