Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Phenomenology of Lucid Dreaming: An Online Survey

Tadas Stumbrys, Daniel Erlacher, Miriam Johnson and Michael Schredl
The American Journal of Psychology
Vol. 127, No. 2 (Summer 2014), pp. 191-204
DOI: 10.5406/amerjpsyc.127.2.0191
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/amerjpsyc.127.2.0191
Page Count: 14
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
The Phenomenology of Lucid Dreaming:
An Online Survey
Preview not available

Abstract

In lucid dreams the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming. Although such dreams are not that uncommon, many aspects of lucid dream phenomenology are still unclear. An online survey was conducted to gather data about lucid dream origination, duration, active or passive participation in the dream, planned actions for lucid dreams, and other phenomenological aspects. Among the 684 respondents who filled out the questionnaire, there were 571 lucid dreamers (83.5%). According to their reports, lucid dreams most often originate spontaneously in adolescence. The average lucid dream duration is about 14 minutes. Lucid dreamers are likely to be active in their lucid dreams and plan to accomplish different actions (e.g., flying, talking with dream characters, or having sex), yet they are not always able to remember or successfully execute their intentions (most often because of awakening or hindrances in the dream environment). The frequency of lucid dream experience was the strongest predictor of lucid dream phenomenology, but some differences were also observed in relation to age, gender, or whether the person is a natural or self-trained lucid dreamer. The findings are discussed in light of lucid dream research, and suggestions for future studies are provided.

Page Thumbnails