Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Explaining the Gender Difference in Nightmare Frequency

Michael Schredl
The American Journal of Psychology
Vol. 127, No. 2 (Summer 2014), pp. 205-213
DOI: 10.5406/amerjpsyc.127.2.0205
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/amerjpsyc.127.2.0205
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
Explaining the Gender Difference in Nightmare Frequency
Preview not available

Abstract

A recent meta-analysis showed a robust gender difference in nightmare frequency of medium effect size in adolescents and young adults: Women tend to report nightmares more frequently than men. The present study, carried out in an unselected student sample, indicates that 2 factors mediate the gender difference in nightmare frequency: neuroticism and overall dream recall frequency. The effect of neuroticism on the gender difference and the finding that the gender difference in nightmare frequency emerges at an age of about 10 years suggest that genderspecific socialization processes may play an important role in explaining the gender differences in nightmare frequency in adolescents and young to middle-aged adults. This idea is supported by the previous finding that nightmare frequency is related to sex role orientation. However, longitudinal studies are necessary to validate these hypotheses.

Page Thumbnails