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African American Women and Their Communities in the Twentieth Century: The Foundation and Future of Black Women’s Studies

Darlene Clark Hine
Black Women, Gender + Families
Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2007), pp. 1-23
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/blacwomegendfami.1.1.0001
Page Count: 23
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African American Women and Their Communities in the Twentieth
                    Century
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Abstract

Abstract “When and where I enter in the quiet, undisputed dignity of my womanhood without violence and without suing or special patronage, then and there the whole Negro race enters with me.” Anna Julia Cooper, A Voice From the South (1892) “After the [Civil] war, the sacrifice of Negro women for freedom and uplift [was] one of the finest chapters in their history. As I look about me today in this veiled world of mine, despite the noisier and more spectacular advance of my brothers, I instinctively feel and now know that it is the five million women of my race who really count.” W. E. B. Du Bois, Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil (1920)

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