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Cross-Dressing the Rose: Sly Allegory in Sea of Poppies

Kathleen Davis
History of the Present
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 86-94
DOI: 10.5406/historypresent.2.1.0086
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/historypresent.2.1.0086
Page Count: 9
Subjects: History
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Cross-Dressing the Rose: Sly Allegory in Sea of Poppies on JSTOR

Notes

  1. 1.
    Paul de Man, “The Rhetoric of Temporality,” in Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticism (1983), 207.
  2. 2.
    Stephen Slemon, “Post-Colonial Allegory and the Transformation of History,” The Journal of Commonwealth Literature 23 (1988): 160.
  3. 3.
    Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies (2008), 431. All subsequent references are in the text.
  4. 4.
    Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun, The Romance of the Rose, trans. Charles Dahlberg (1983), 32–37.
  5. 5.
    Mahasveta Devi, “Draupadi,” trans. Gayatri Spivak, Critical Inquiry 8, no. 2 (1981): 381–402.
  6. 6.
    Gayatri Spivak, translator's foreword to Devi, “Draupadi,” 389.
  7. 7.
    Walter Benjamin, The Origin of German Tragic Drama, trans. John Osborne (2003).
  8. 8.
    Howard Caygill, “Walter Benjamin's Concept of Allegory,” in The Cambridge Companion to Allegory, ed. Rita Copeland and Peter T. Struck (2010), 249.
  9. 9.
    See David Hult, Self-Fulfilling Prophecies: Readership and Authority in the FirstRoman de la Rose” (1986), chapter one, for discussion of this temporality and its implications for fiction and history.
  10. 10.
    Kevin Brownlee, “Allegory in the Roman de la Rose,” in The Cambridge Companion to Allegory, ed. Rita Copeland and Peter T. Struck (2010), 124.
  11. 11.
    Amitav Ghosh, In an Antique Land: History in the Guise of a Traveler's Tale (1994), 82.
  12. 12.
    Romance of the Rose, 36–37.
  13. 13.
    On The Romance of the Rose's attention to limits of linguistic referentiality and semantic fixity, as well as its continual delay of interpretation, see Brownlee, “Allegory in the Roman de la Rose,” 119–35. On the history of allegory, allegoresis, and the issue of semantic fixity, including in Romance of the Rose, see Rita Copeland and Stephen Melville, “Allegory and Allegoresis, Rhetoric and Hermeneutics,” Exemplaria 3 (1991): 159–87.
  14. 14.
    Romance of the Rose, 136.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Paul de Man, “The Rhetoric of Temporality,” in Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticism (1983), 207.
  2. 2.
    Stephen Slemon, “Post-Colonial Allegory and the Transformation of History,” The Journal of Commonwealth Literature 23 (1988): 160.
  3. 3.
    Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies (2008), 431. All subsequent references are in the text.
  4. 4.
    Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun, The Romance of the Rose, trans. Charles Dahlberg (1983), 32–37.
  5. 5.
    Mahasveta Devi, “Draupadi,” trans. Gayatri Spivak, Critical Inquiry 8, no. 2 (1981): 381–402.
  6. 6.
    Gayatri Spivak, translator's foreword to Devi, “Draupadi,” 389.
  7. 7.
    Walter Benjamin, The Origin of German Tragic Drama, trans. John Osborne (2003).
  8. 8.
    Howard Caygill, “Walter Benjamin's Concept of Allegory,” in The Cambridge Companion to Allegory, ed. Rita Copeland and Peter T. Struck (2010), 249.
  9. 9.
    See David Hult, Self-Fulfilling Prophecies: Readership and Authority in the FirstRoman de la Rose” (1986), chapter one, for discussion of this temporality and its implications for fiction and history.
  10. 10.
    Kevin Brownlee, “Allegory in the Roman de la Rose,” in The Cambridge Companion to Allegory, ed. Rita Copeland and Peter T. Struck (2010), 124.
  11. 11.
    Amitav Ghosh, In an Antique Land: History in the Guise of a Traveler's Tale (1994), 82.
  12. 12.
    Romance of the Rose, 36–37.
  13. 13.
    On The Romance of the Rose's attention to limits of linguistic referentiality and semantic fixity, as well as its continual delay of interpretation, see Brownlee, “Allegory in the Roman de la Rose,” 119–35. On the history of allegory, allegoresis, and the issue of semantic fixity, including in Romance of the Rose, see Rita Copeland and Stephen Melville, “Allegory and Allegoresis, Rhetoric and Hermeneutics,” Exemplaria 3 (1991): 159–87.
  14. 14.
    Romance of the Rose, 136.