Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

On the Use of Animals in Emergent Embryonic Stem Cell Research for Spinal Cord Injuries

Andrew Fenton and Frederic Gilbert
Journal of Animal Ethics
Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2011), pp. 37-45
DOI: 10.5406/janimalethics.1.1.0037
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/janimalethics.1.1.0037
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
On the Use of Animals in Emergent Embryonic Stem Cell Research for
                    Spinal Cord Injuries
Preview not available

Abstract

In early 2009, President Obama overturned the ban on federal funding for research involving the derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also approved Geron’s first-in-human hESC trial for spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We anticipate an increase in both research in the United States to derive hESC and applications to the FDA for approval of clinical trials involving transplantation of hESCs. An increase of such clinical trials will require a concomitant increase in the number of preceding preclinical assays. We examine important issues concerning the use of animals in SCI stem cell research that require a reevaluation of the moral permissibility of studies such as Geron’s.

Page Thumbnails