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“Why Is No One Talking about Libya's Cultural Destruction?”

Neil Brodie
Near Eastern Archaeology
Vol. 78, No. 3, Special Issue: The Cultural Heritage Crisis in the Middle East (September 2015), pp. 212-217
DOI: 10.5615/neareastarch.78.3.0212
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5615/neareastarch.78.3.0212
Page Count: 6
Subjects: Archaeology Classical Studies Religion Middle East Studies
Find more content in these subjects: Archaeology Classical Studies Religion Middle East Studies
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“Why Is No One Talking about Libya's Cultural Destruction?” on JSTOR
ARTICLES

Abstract

Since 1990, as country after country throughout West Asia and North Africa has fallen victim to civil disturbance or conflict, its cultural heritage has been looted to feed the demand of an international antiquities market. International public policy has failed to achieve any kind of hold on the problem. This paper looks at the reasons for policy failure, with a particular emphasis on recently implemented policy initiatives intended to safeguard cultural heritage in Syria. The paper is critical of the relationship between traditional and social media news reporting and policy making. It concludes by arguing that attempts to safeguard cultural heritage at its source are inappropriate for the task at hand and more needs to be done to tackle demand on the destination market.

Author Information

Neil Brodie

Neil Brodie graduated from the University of Liverpool with a Ph.D. in Archaeology in 1991 and has held positions at the British School at Athens, the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, where he was Research Director of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre, and Stanford University's Archaeology Center. Since February 2012 he has been Senior Research Fellow at the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, at the University of Glasgow, where he is researching the criminology and economics of the antiquities market as part of the ERC-funded Trafficking Culture project. He has worked on archaeological projects in the United Kingdom, Greece, and Jordan, and continues to work in Greece.

References

  1. Abdulrahman, Ammar. 2001. The New Syrian Law on Antiquities. Pp. 111–14 in Trade in Illicit Antiquities: The Destruction of the World's Archaeological Heritage, N. Brodie, Jennifer Doole, and Colin Renfrew, eds. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.
  2. Al-Azm, Amr. 2015. The Pillaging of Syria's Cultural Heritage. Middle East Institute, May 22, http://www.mei.edu/content/at/pillaging-syrias-cultural-heritage? (accessed June 19, 2015).
  3. Al-Azm, Amr, Salam Al-Kuntar, and Brian I. Daniels. 2014. ISIS' Antiquities Sideline. New York Times, September 2, 2014.
  4. Brodie, Neil. In press. Syria and its Regional Neighbors: A Case of Cultural Property Protection Policy Failure? International Journal of Cultural Property.
  5. Casana, Jesse and Mitra Panahipour. 2014. Notes on a Disappearing Past: Satellite-Based Monitoring of Looting and Damage to Archaeological Sites in Syria. Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies 2: 128–51.
  6. Chulov, Martin. 2014. “How an Arrest in Iraq Revealed Isis's $2bn Jihadist Network.” Guardian, June 15, 2014.
  7. Cunliffe, Emma. 2012. Damage to the Soul: Syria's Cultural Heritage in Conflict. Palo Alto: Global Heritage Fund, http://ghn.globalheritagefund.com/uploads/documents/document_2107.pdf (accessed June 19, 2015).
  8. Di Lernia, Savino. 2015. Save Libyan Archaeology. Nature 517, January 29: 547–49.
  9. Elia, Ricardo J. 1993. A Seductive and Troubling Work. Archaeology 46(1): 64–69.
  10. Mallonee, Laura C. 2015. Why is No One Talking about Libya's Cultural Destruction? Hyperallergic, February 2. http://hyperallergic.com/179246/why-is-no-one-talking-about-libyas-cultural-destruction/ (accessed June 19, 2015).
  11. Peters, Gretchen. 2010. Crime and Insurgency in the Tribal Areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan. West Point: Combating Terrorism Center, https://www.ctc.usma.edu/posts/crime-and-insurgency-in-the-tribal-areas-of-afghanistan-and-pakistan (accessed June 19, 2015).

References

  1. Abdulrahman, Ammar. 2001. The New Syrian Law on Antiquities. Pp. 111–14 in Trade in Illicit Antiquities: The Destruction of the World's Archaeological Heritage, N. Brodie, Jennifer Doole, and Colin Renfrew, eds. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.
  2. Al-Azm, Amr. 2015. The Pillaging of Syria's Cultural Heritage. Middle East Institute, May 22, http://www.mei.edu/content/at/pillaging-syrias-cultural-heritage? (accessed June 19, 2015).
  3. Al-Azm, Amr, Salam Al-Kuntar, and Brian I. Daniels. 2014. ISIS' Antiquities Sideline. New York Times, September 2, 2014.
  4. Brodie, Neil. In press. Syria and its Regional Neighbors: A Case of Cultural Property Protection Policy Failure? International Journal of Cultural Property.
  5. Casana, Jesse and Mitra Panahipour. 2014. Notes on a Disappearing Past: Satellite-Based Monitoring of Looting and Damage to Archaeological Sites in Syria. Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies 2: 128–51.
  6. Chulov, Martin. 2014. “How an Arrest in Iraq Revealed Isis's $2bn Jihadist Network.” Guardian, June 15, 2014.
  7. Cunliffe, Emma. 2012. Damage to the Soul: Syria's Cultural Heritage in Conflict. Palo Alto: Global Heritage Fund, http://ghn.globalheritagefund.com/uploads/documents/document_2107.pdf (accessed June 19, 2015).
  8. Di Lernia, Savino. 2015. Save Libyan Archaeology. Nature 517, January 29: 547–49.
  9. Elia, Ricardo J. 1993. A Seductive and Troubling Work. Archaeology 46(1): 64–69.
  10. Mallonee, Laura C. 2015. Why is No One Talking about Libya's Cultural Destruction? Hyperallergic, February 2. http://hyperallergic.com/179246/why-is-no-one-talking-about-libyas-cultural-destruction/ (accessed June 19, 2015).
  11. Peters, Gretchen. 2010. Crime and Insurgency in the Tribal Areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan. West Point: Combating Terrorism Center, https://www.ctc.usma.edu/posts/crime-and-insurgency-in-the-tribal-areas-of-afghanistan-and-pakistan (accessed June 19, 2015).