Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

AB-USING ENLIGHTENMENT: STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT, STORYTELLING, AND THE PUBLIC USE OF REASON

Bishupal Limbu
Cultural Critique
Vol. 84 (Spring 2013), pp. 35-69
DOI: 10.5749/culturalcritique.84.2013.0035
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/culturalcritique.84.2013.0035
Page Count: 35
  • Download ($16.00)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
AB-USING ENLIGHTENMENT: STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT, STORYTELLING, AND THE PUBLIC USE OF REASON
Preview not available

Abstract

This article is centered around two seemingly unrelated documents: a letter found on the dead bodies of two Guinean teenagers discovered in the wheel compartment of an aircraft flying from Conakry to Brussels; and Bamako, a 2006 film by Abderrahmane Sissako. It argues that Bamako deploys the Kantian notion of enlightenment as the public use of reason in a postcolonial context to criticize the failed development policies of global financial institutions such as the World Bank and the IMF. Whereas the public sphere is often conceptualized as a space for storytelling, a reading of the dead boys' story and letter via the film reveals that it is more usefully engaged as the site for an active and persistent practice of argument.

Page Thumbnails