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Outcome Evaluation of U.S. Department of State Support for the Global Methane Initiative

Outcome Evaluation of U.S. Department of State Support for the Global Methane Initiative

Nicholas Burger
Noreen Clancy
Yashodhara Rana
Rena Rudavsky
Aimee E. Curtright
Francisco Perez-Arce
Joanne K. Yoong
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 98
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt3fh1nq
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  • Book Info
    Outcome Evaluation of U.S. Department of State Support for the Global Methane Initiative
    Book Description:

    The Global Methane Initiative (GMI) is a voluntary international partnership that promotes methane recovery and reuse activities in developing and transition economies. The U.S. Department of State requested an evaluation of the activities and outcomes supported in whole or in part by its contributions to GMI to gauge its value added to the program.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-8113-1
    Subjects: Physics, Environmental Science, Chemistry
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface (pp. iii-iv)
    Keith Crane
  3. Table of Contents (pp. v-viii)
  4. Figures and Tables (pp. ix-x)
  5. Summary (pp. xi-xviii)

    Methane is a greenhouse gas (GHG) that has more than 20 times the warming power of carbon dioxide (CO₂) but remains in the atmosphere for a shorter amount of time.¹ Methane emissions are released during the course of a wide range of activities: the production and transport of coal, natural gas, and oil; raising livestock and other agricultural practices; and the decay of organic waste in municipal solid waste landfills and some wastewater treatment systems. In 2004, 14 countries came together under the leadership of the United States to launch the Methane to Markets Partnership. The program was relaunched in...

  6. Acknowledgments (pp. xix-xx)
  7. Abbreviations (pp. xxi-xxii)
  8. CHAPTER ONE Introduction (pp. 1-12)

    The Global Methane Initiative (GMI) is a voluntary international partnership program that promotes cost-effective, near-term methane recovery and reuse activities in developing and transition economies with participation from the private sector, development banks, and other governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Methane is a short-lived greenhouse gas (GHG) that has more than 20 times the atmospheric warming effect of carbon dioxide (CO₂). Recognizing the important role of methane in global warming and its potential use as a clean energy source, 14 countries came together in 2004 under the leadership of the United States to launch the Methane to Markets Partnership, which was...

  9. CHAPTER TWO Quantitative Analysis of DoS Contributions to GMI Funding, Activities, and Outcomes (pp. 13-32)

    In this chapter, we summarize the existingquantitativeprogram data, which allowed us to determine USG (and DoS) contributions to GMI, the range of activities undertaken with that support, and the resulting outcomes. The available quantitative data have limitations in terms of completeness. Chapter Three addresses gaps in the quantitative data with qualitative information from our interviews and country site visits. We begin this chapter by summarizing our evaluation approach using quantitative data, then we present summary information related to three of the evaluation metrics.

    In this section, we have three goals related to the evaluation framework presented in Figure...

  10. CHAPTER THREE Qualitative Observations of DoS Contributions (pp. 33-56)

    As discussed earlier, GMI is a partnership meant to promote methane capture and use activities and reduce barriers to implementing these activities, rather than solely implement emissions reduction technologies. As a result, much of its effort and value is not captured in the quantitative information outlined in Chapter Two. In an effort to collect information on GMI that was not captured in the database and to assess the value added from DoS contributions to the non-quantitative portions of GMI, we also collected qualitative information about GMI, its activities, and outcomes. Collecting this qualitative information involved examining program documentation (e.g., GMI...

  11. CHAPTER FOUR Findings and Recommendations (pp. 57-64)

    The primary purpose of this evaluation was to identify the value added of DoS contributions to GMI in FYs 2006–2010. To do this, we structured an analysis that first examined the overall GMI program at an aggregate level against which we could measure DOS value added. To assess DoS value added, we examined DoS contributions to GMI (funding as well as programmatic and strategic support) and looked at both quantitative and qualitative output and outcome measures, including information gathered from three country site visits.

    The previous two chapters described the detailed quantitative and qualitative information collected as a result...

  12. APPENDIX A GMI Partner Countries (pp. 65-66)
  13. APPENDIX B Site Visit Interview Protocol (pp. 67-70)
  14. APPENDIX C Ideas for Establishing Performance Metrics for Gender Impacts (pp. 71-72)
  15. APPENDIX D Site Visits: Site Selection Process, Protocol Development, and Contacting Respondents (pp. 73-74)
  16. Bibliography (pp. 75-76)