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The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases

The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S.National Security and Public Health Policy

Jennifer Brower
Peter Chalk
Copyright Date: 2003
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 166
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1602rc
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  • Book Info
    The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases
    Book Description:

    This study offers a more comprehensive analysis of the security implications of the spread of infectious diseases than has been done to date. The study examines the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa, highlighting this particular crisis as a graphic example of the devastating effects that infectious disease can have on virtually every aspect of a state's functioning viability. It also makes a detailed analysis of the United States, delineating the threat posed by specific diseases; assessing the effectiveness of the existing public health infrastructure; and offering specific actions that can be taken to improve the country's ability to meet this emerging challenge. ISBN: 0-8330-3293-3 Price: $20.00 Est. page count: last roman--xvii

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3415-1
    Subjects: Political Science, Health Sciences
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Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents (pp. v-viii)
  4. FIGURE (pp. ix-x)
  5. TABLES (pp. xi-xii)
  6. SUMMARY (pp. xiii-xxii)
  7. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (pp. xxiii-xxiv)
  8. ABBREVIATIONS (pp. xxv-xxviii)
  9. Chapter One DISEASE AND HUMAN SECURITY (pp. 1-12)

    With the collapse of the Soviet bloc in Eastern Europe in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it appeared that the world system could be on the threshold of an era of unprecedented peace and stability. Politicians, diplomats, and academics alike began to forecast the imminent establishment of a new world order, increasingly managed by an integrated international system based on the principles of liberal democracy and the free market.¹ As this new world order emerged, so it was assumed that serious threats to international stability and security would decline commensurately.

    However, the initial euphoria that was evoked by the...

  10. Chapter Two FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE INCREASED INCIDENCE AND SPREAD OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES (pp. 13-30)

    The bubonic plague that swept across Europe during the Middle Ages, the smallpox that was carried to the Americas by the Spanish, and the influenza outbreak of 1918 all bear testimony to the historic relevance of infectious pathogens and their ability to cause widespread death and suffering. In many ways, however, the nature and magnitude of the threat posed by infectious pathogens are greater today than they have ever been in the past, developments in modern science notwithstanding. Emerging and reemerging infections present daily challenges to existing medical capabilities. Not only have deadly and previously unimagined illnesses, such as AIDS,...

  11. Chapter Three AIDS IN SOUTH AFRICA: EXTENT, IMPLICATIONS, AND RESPONSE (pp. 31-60)

    The contemporary HIV/AIDS crisis in South Africa represents an acute example of how infectious diseases can undermine national resilience and regional stability. Roughly 25 percent of the country’s adult population is currently infected with HIV, which makes South Africa one of the most severely affected AIDS states in the world. The consequences of the disease have been as marked as they have been pervasive, negatively impacting on virtually all levels of the country’s security—broadly defined—as well as significant aspects of Pretoria’s frontline neighbors. As James Wolfenson, president of the World Bank, has remarked:

    Many of us used to...

  12. Chapter Four U.S. SECURITY AND THE RISK POSED BY INFECTIOUS DISEASES (pp. 61-74)

    While the average American life expectancy is substantially higher than it was in the past (and continues to grow) and many infectious diseases have been eliminated from the continent over the past century, microorganisms still pose a significant and increasing threat to the country. According to the National Intelligence Council (NIC), “New and reemerging infectious diseases will . . . complicate US and global security over the next 20 years. These diseases will endanger US citizens at home and abroad, threaten armed forces deployed overseas, and exacerbate social and political instability in key countries and regions in which the United...

  13. Chapter Five U.S. CAPABILITIES TO COUNTER INFECTIOUS DISEASES (pp. 75-100)

    In 1992, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) challenged the United States to respond to the threat of infectious diseases by improving public health and medical capacity. Partly in response to the IOM, in 1994 the CDC drafted a strategy that included improvements in surveillance, applied research, prevention and control, and infrastructure.¹ Recognizing the ongoing risks of increasing global interdependencies, in 1995 the National Science and Technology Council’s CISET further recommended that the United States play a stronger role in global efforts to control infectious disease.² The CISET report served as the basis for a 1996 Presidential Decision Directive calling for...

  14. Chapter Six CONCLUSION (pp. 101-106)

    This report has highlighted infectious disease as a serious risk both to the international system and to the United States. The overall threat is being driven by globalization, inadvertent consequences stemming from modern medical and agricultural practices, behavioral changes, environmental factors such as climatic change, and the growing danger of bioterrorism. The study specifically recognizes that microbial challenges cannot be territorially bounded and, therefore, need to be understood and dealt with in a larger global context. Further, the analysis delineates disease as a highly pervasive influence that not only impinges on security in terms of traditional conceptions of state stability,...

  15. Appendix CDC SURVEILLANCE AND COLLECTION SYSTEMS (pp. 107-118)
  16. BIBLIOGRAPHY (pp. 119-148)