Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Universal Screening for Behavioral and Emotional Risk: A Promising Method for Reducing Disproportionate Placement in Special Education

Tara C. Raines, Bridget V. Dever, Randy W. Kamphaus and Andrew T. Roach
The Journal of Negro Education
Vol. 81, No. 3, Special Issue: Testing and Assessing African Americans: Past, Present, and Future Problems and Promises (Summer 2012), pp. 283-296
DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.81.3.0283
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7709/jnegroeducation.81.3.0283
Page Count: 14
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
Universal Screening for Behavioral and Emotional Risk: A Promising Method for Reducing Disproportionate Placement in Special Education
Preview not available

Abstract

The overrepresentation of U.S. minority students identified for emotional and behavior disorders special education programs plagues schools and challenges researchers and practitioners. Arcane methods including teacher nomination continue to guide referral processes, despite compelling evidence of their influence on disproportionate special education placement for children of color. As universal screening practices are deployed, emerging evidence suggests that requiring a teacher, parent, or student to complete a rating scale may reduce disproportionality. By using available research to posit that if schools engage in universal screening of behavioral and emotional risk using formal scales, fewer children of color would be placed in special education programs. The logical and evidentiary case for universal screening is made and questions requiring more research are presented.

Page Thumbnails