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Understanding the Relationships among Racial Identity, Self-Efficacy, Institutional Integration and Academic Achievement of Black Males Attending Research Universities

Karl W. Reid
The Journal of Negro Education
Vol. 82, No. 1, The 32nd Annual Charles H. Thompson Lecture The Declining Significance of Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Relevance, Reputation, and Reality in Obamamerica (Winter 2013), pp. 75-93
DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.82.1.0075
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7709/jnegroeducation.82.1.0075
Page Count: 19
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Understanding the Relationships among Racial Identity, Self-Efficacy, Institutional Integration and Academic Achievement of Black Males Attending Research Universities
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Abstract

This study asserts that African American males with higher grade point averages (GPAs) in college are also academically and socially integrated into campus and hold racial identity attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs that facilitate their level of institutional integration. The statistical study of 190 African American males attending five research universities reveals that successful African American males report a heightened sense of self-efficacy and were more satisfied with opportunities to interact with faculty. Black males with higher GPAs in college also report higher levels of faculty and social integration, though the relationship is moderated by their racial identity attitudes. Recommendations for improving educational outcomes of Black males attending predominantly White research universities are made.

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