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Journal Article

African American Homeschooling and the Question of Curricular Cultural Relevance

Ama Mazama and Garvey Lundy
The Journal of Negro Education
Vol. 82, No. 2, The 33rd Annual Charles H. Thompson Lecture"Stakes is High": Educating New Century Students (Spring 2013), pp. 123-138
DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.82.2.0123
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7709/jnegroeducation.82.2.0123
Page Count: 16
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African American Homeschooling and the Question of Curricular Cultural Relevance
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Abstract

Homeschooling, and academic interest in this phenomenon, have increased tremendously over the last decade. The surge of African American involvement in the homeschool movement has also become noticeable. However, there continues to be a general paucity of research on the motivations of African American parents that choose homeschooling. In order to capture the voice of African American homeschoolers, the authors conducted seventy-four interviews in the spring and summer of 2010 in several large U.S. metropolitan areas. The findings revealed that curricular considerations play a critical part, since many African American homeschoolers believe that a Eurocentric curriculum is bound to gravely interfere with their children’s self-esteem and sense of purpose.

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