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Journal Article

“All I Do is Win . . . No Matter What”: Low-Income, African American Single Mothers and their Collegiate Daughters’ Unrelenting Academic Achievement

Johnitha Watkins Johnson
The Journal of Negro Education
Vol. 85, No. 2, The 36th Annual Charles H. Thompson Lecture: Why Black Lives (and Minds) Matter: Race, Freedom Schools & the Quest for Educational Equity (Spring 2016), pp. 156-171
DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.85.2.0156
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7709/jnegroeducation.85.2.0156
Page Count: 16
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“All I Do is Win . . . No Matter What”: Low-Income, African American Single Mothers and their Collegiate Daughters’ Unrelenting Academic Achievement
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Abstract

Demystifying the low-income African American single mother is a task scholars have yet to comprehensively execute. Despite superior work elucidating single-mothered homes, mother–daughter relationships, and academic achievement, scholars have yet to concomitantly exam these issues. This inquiry resolves the literature gap by examining the narratives of academically successful African American female collegians regarding their single mother’s parenting acts and grooming toward collegiate achievement. In contrast to pathologizing studies, this study found that low-income African American single mothers •sociocultural identity stimulated their daughter’s academic stamina, •developed their daughter’s steadfast character by embracing their perceived oppression, •authoritative parenting style internally admonished and motivated their daughter, and •extended a degree of trust, which facilitated their daughter’s academic independence.

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