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Journal Article

Adolescent African American Girls as Engaged Readers: Challenging Stereotypical Images of Black Womanhood through Urban Fiction

Simone Gibson
The Journal of Negro Education
Vol. 85, No. 3, Why We Can’t Wait: (Re)Examining the Opportunities and Challenges for Black Women and Girls in Education (Summer 2016), pp. 212-224
DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.85.3.0212
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7709/jnegroeducation.85.3.0212
Page Count: 13
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Adolescent African American Girls as Engaged Readers: Challenging Stereotypical Images of Black Womanhood through Urban Fiction
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Abstract

This article explores the ways some adolescent African American girls engage with urban fiction, a genre often maligned as “trash” literature. This project sought to understand the appeal of the genre as well as adolescent African American girls’ perceptions about the texts. Based on findings, which suggest that participants are engaging with the genre in critical ways, conclusions may support non-traditional approaches to helping adolescent Africa American girls deconstruct and challenge stereotypic and dominant messages about the underrepresented lives of African Americans.

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