Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Role of Theory in Oral and Written Language Curricula

A. D. Pellegrini and Lee Galda
The Elementary School Journal
Vol. 87, No. 2 (Nov., 1986), pp. 201-208
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1001359
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Role of Theory in Oral and Written Language Curricula
Preview not available

Abstract

In this article we outline Halliday's theory of language production. This theory, which has been experimentally supported, holds that the forms of oral and written language are determined by the contexts in which the language is generated. Curricular and instructional recommendations are suggested wherein teachers manipulate the mode of discourse (i. e., channel and genre) to have predicted effects on students' language production.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[201]
    [201]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208