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Journal Article

Reinventing John Dewey's "Pedagogy as a University Discipline"

Thomas Ehrlich
The Elementary School Journal
Vol. 98, No. 5, Special Issue: John Dewey: The Chicago Years (May, 1998), pp. 489-509
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1002327
Page Count: 21
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Reinventing John Dewey's "Pedagogy as a University Discipline"
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Abstract

Just a century ago, John Dewey proposed that pedagogy be recognized as a university discipline. Significant progress is being made on 3 important fronts to promote pedagogy as a platform in higher education, though it is still not a distinct field of study. The first front is pedagogies of engagement-community-service learning, problem-based learning, and collaborative learning. The second is the assessment of student learning. And the third is the preparation of teachers for undergraduate teaching. In combination, these trends show significant potential for enhancing undergraduate education. Their full promise will be realized, however, only if they are linked together-only if preparation for teaching undergraduates includes both the pedagogies of engagement and attention to the assessment of student learning. That linkage would be inevitable if pedagogy were a university discipline along the lines that Dewey proposed. It is worthwhile, therefore, to speculate on what a school of pedagogy would look like if one were to be started today.

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