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Neoplastic Transformation of Chimpanzee Cells Induced by Adenovirus Type 12-Simian Virus 40 Hybrid Virus

Johng S. Rhim, Roy Trimmer, Paul Arnstein and Robert J. Huebner
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 78, No. 1, [Part 2: Biological Sciences] (Jan., 1981), pp. 313-317
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10035
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Neoplastic Transformation of Chimpanzee Cells Induced by Adenovirus Type 12-Simian Virus 40 Hybrid Virus
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Abstract

The adenovirus 12-simian virus 40 hybrid virus produced neoplastic transformation of chimpanzee skin fibroblasts in vitro. The transformed fibroblasts showed morphological alteration and became permanent lines. The transformed cells contained both adenovirus 12 and simian virus 40 large tumor antigens and were virus producers. However at passage 9, one line (WES) was found to be a nonproducer, producing neither infectious virus nor virus-specific antigen detectable by the complement fixation test. Virus particles were not detected nor could infectious hybrid virus be rescued from this line by cocultivation with Vero cells. The transformed cells formed large cell aggregates and grew in liquid growth medium above an agar base, formed colonies in soft agar, and grew to high saturation densities; the normal chimpanzee skin fibroblasts did not. One transformed WES line produced tumors when transplanted subcutaneously into newborn nude mice, thus providing an important tool for studying tumor immunity in the chimpanzee.

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