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Aids and Obstacles to Political Stability in Mid-Africa

G. Mennen Williams
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 342, American Foreign Policy Challenged (Jul., 1962), pp. 1-8
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1033155
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Aids and Obstacles to Political Stability in Mid-Africa
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Abstract

The emergence of twenty-three independent nations in mid-Africa is a major event of the twentieth century. The attitude of United States foreign policy toward them is that we want for the Africans what they want for themselves. Four major regional groupings have appeared in mid-Africa: the Union Africaine et Malgache, the Casablanca group, the East African Common Services Organization, and the Lagos group. These groupings overlap and may appear confused, but they are responsive to African needs. There is a body of common interest at all levels and a feeling of the need for co-operation to develop Africa. Substantial co-operation has been achieved in economic and technological development and in cultural relations. Movements which are Pan-African in scope are underway. So far, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and the Commission for Technical Co-operation in Africa South of the Sahara are the agencies in which virtually all mid-African nations have been most active. All the nations and groupings are fiercely proud of maintaining their purely African personality. They realize, at the same time, their dependence not only on each other but also on outside assistance, especially in the form of capital and expertise, to accomplish their plans and purposes. Mid-Africa affords us excellent opportunities to revitalize our dedication to the American revolutionary heritage and democratic tradition.

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