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The Preparation of Peace Corps Volunteers for Overseas Service: Challenge and Response

Donald R. Shea
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 365, The Peace Corps (May, 1966), pp. 29-45
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1034936
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Preparation of Peace Corps Volunteers for Overseas Service: Challenge and Response
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Abstract

In order to be selected to serve abroad, Peace Corps Volunteers have first to complete successfully an intensive training program designed to develop attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary for effective overseas service. The great majority of these training programs have been conducted by colleges and universities. It has been a great challenge both to the Peace Corps and to higher education to work together to develop training programs which would prepare the Volunteers for their work in a vastly different culture. Although, initially, universities encountered great difficulties in administering successful training programs, the experience gained has resulted in considerable improvement in the techniques of instruction and content of the training programs. Peace Corps Volunteers are now the best prepared group of Americans going overseas. Lessons learned in developing effective educational programs for Volunteers have had a beneficial impact on the regular instructional programs of many universities. Both higher education and the Peace Corps have benefited from their educational partnership, which is likely to become even more mutually productive in the future.

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