Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Living with China as a Great Power

O. Edmund Clubb
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 351, The Changing Cold War (Jan., 1964), pp. 140-147
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1035229
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Living with China as a Great Power
Preview not available

Abstract

China has resumed its traditional power position in Asia. It is beset by economic difficulties aggravated by the Sino-Soviet dispute but has not renounced its determination to become the dominant power in Asia. The United States, once committed to upholding the Open Door policy in China, now is bound by an alliance with Formosa and maintains a policy of complete nonintercourse with mainland China. That policy, besides being written into law, is sustained in its present form by strong interests. American efforts to get others to follow its policy line, however, are of declining effectiveness. Other countries are interested especially in trends in the China trade, now shifting somewhat toward "capitalist" countries. The United States cannot share in that trade just for the asking; Formosa is the block. The American China policy thus is involved in the China issue in the United Nations. Trends there favor a "two Chinas" solution. The joint American-Formosan position can only deteriorate, not improve, in the United Nations. It will take long to adjust our relationship with China, but the matter should be undertaken, by progressive steps initiated now, looking toward the ultimate resolution of the Formosa problem. Only then can the United States deal effectively with China.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147