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Indian National Character in the Twentieth Century

Dhirendra Narain
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 370, National Character in the Perspective of the Social Sciences (Mar., 1967), pp. 124-132
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1038058
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Indian National Character in the Twentieth Century
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Abstract

Indian national character in the twentieth century is here examined in the historical context of long political subjugation, the value system, the social structure, and the socialization process. Of particular importance was the experience of conquest first under the Muslims, then under the British. The collective "inferiority complex" generated in these historical circumstances is confirmed and reinforced by some features of family and caste. Salient traits of Indian character which have resulted have included absence of commitment, a peculiar identification with the mother, a peculiar attitude toward authority, and various contradictions in the Indian personality.

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