Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The American Occupation of Japan-Perspectives after Three Decades

Robert A. Scalapino
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 428, The American Revolution Abroad (Nov., 1976), pp. 104-113
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1041877
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The American Occupation of Japan-Perspectives after Three Decades
Preview not available

Abstract

The occupation of Japan provided an unusual opportunity for the United States to influence the patterns of political life in a country that was defeated both psychologically and physically. Under the personal leadership of General Douglas MacArthur, punishment was dealt to "war criminals," thus reducing severely Japan's military establishment; a series of economic and political reforms were instituted, resulting in the constitution of 1947 which has not been amended since. With the rise of the People's Republic of China (1949), the Korean War (1950), and the end of the occupation in the early 1950s, the circumstances of the Cold War led to an alliance between Japan and the United States that stressed the importance of Japan's regional defensive strength rather than the demilitarized posture of the occupation years. The occupation was a signal success for its time and purpose. It is likely that Japan will maintain most of the political changes made by the constitution of 1947 and will continue its special strategic and economic relationship with the United States, while at the same time making accommodations with the PRC and other states in the world, with a stress on Asia.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113