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Transitions and Models of Intervention

Phyllis R. Silverman
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 464, Middle and Late Life Transitions (Nov., 1982), pp. 174-187
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1043823
Page Count: 14
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Transitions and Models of Intervention
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Abstract

All transitions are associated with change. People, basically conservative by nature, tend to resist change. Any intervention needs to consider that reactions to a transition are affected by prior experience, by the way transitions are viewed in an individual's social network, and by what learning opportunities are available. Responses can be viewed as typical under the circumstances, with rites of passage and helpers available to guide people in coping; or they can be viewed as a result of deficits in the individual for which treatment is prescribed. To facilitate change, seen as an expected event, individuals need to be linked to resources and information. They need role models and legitimation of their feelings. Learning, at such times of stress, seems to be facilitated by the availability of a peer, in the sense that the helper has had a similar experience. This help is available in mutual help groups. However, many kinds of help need to be available. The goal of any help is to empower the individual to cope in ways that promote growth and change.

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