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New Dimensions of Soviet Arctic Policy: Views from the Soviet Union

Raphael V. Vartanov and Alexei Yu. Roginko
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 512, The Nordic Region: Changing Perspectives in International Relations (Nov., 1990), pp. 69-78
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1046887
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
New Dimensions of Soviet Arctic Policy: Views from the Soviet Union
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Abstract

Radically new approaches to the formation of both foreign and domestic Arctic policy have been established in the USSR. Design of a real Arctic policy founded on these approaches is proceeding at a slow pace, however, and all means of dealing with Arctic issues through departmental approaches have been exhausted. Of all the Arctic problems facing the country, questions related to a radical restructuring of the social outlook of the North and developing its infrastructure are being brought to the forefront. Development of the Soviet North has resulted in a deep conflict between the economic interests of industrial civilization and the Arctic ecosystems now functioning at critical levels. More important, the interests, the identity, and the very existence of small Northern aboriginal peoples are at stake. Yet a certain optimism is inspired by several factors: awareness of the challenge facing the Soviet Union in the Arctic; active involvement of a major scientific effort; institutionalized participation of the native peoples in decision making; and an ever expanding role played by a sphere of international cooperation.

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