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Women's Work, Women's Movement: Taking Stock

Emily Stoper
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 515, American Feminism: New Issues for a Mature Movement (May, 1991), pp. 151-162
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1046935
Page Count: 12
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Women's Work, Women's Movement: Taking Stock
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Abstract

Since the late 1960s, the women's movement has been strongly associated with the advancement of women's position in the work force. In spite of antidiscrimination laws, women still earn only about 70 percent of what men do. Three strategies to further reduce the wage gap are considered in detail: affirmative action, pay equity, and policies to make it easier to combine work and family life. Questions are raised about the implications of these strategies for the future of the women's movement.

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