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The Use and Abuse of Power: The Supreme Court and Separation of Powers

Kent A. Kirwan
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 537, Ethics in American Public Service (Jan., 1995), pp. 76-84
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1047755
Page Count: 9
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The Use and Abuse of Power: The Supreme Court and Separation of Powers
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Abstract

The theme of this article is the use and abuse of power in relation to politics and ethics. The role of the United States Supreme Court as the umpire of the structure of separation of powers is explored through analysis of two relatively recent cases. This is followed, in conclusion, with some reflections on the ethical implications of our constitutional and political principles and on the role of the Court as ethical guide.

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