Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Language, Identity, and the Nationalist Impulse: Quebec

Dale Thomson
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 538, Being and Becoming Canada (Mar., 1995), pp. 69-82
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1048327
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Language, Identity, and the Nationalist Impulse: Quebec
Preview not available

Abstract

Quebec nationalism constitutes a clear case of ethnonationalism in the developed world. This article draws on the research of social psychologist Henri Tajfel, who argues that ethnic movements are motivated primarily by a need to establish a positive social identity. It also identifies language, and in this case the French language, as both the distinguishing characteristic of ethnic identity and the principal vehicle of ethnic assertiveness. The origins of Quebec ethnonationalism are surveyed, and then it is examined in the context of the highly modern and democratic society that the province has become. Answers are sought to such questions as: In what measure is it a specific case, and in what measure does it reflect wider trends? How can its present exceptional vitality be explained? How different is Quebec really from the rest of Canada, indeed, of North America? Do those differences require it to be a separate country? The burning question of whether Quebec will in fact become a sovereign state remains unanswered, but information and insights are provided on which to base conjectures on the subject.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82